Su última visita fue: Mar Nov 21, 2017 2:38 am Fecha actual Mar Nov 21, 2017 2:38 am

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]




 [ 19 mensajes ]  Ir a página Previo  1, 2
Autor Mensaje
 Asunto: Re: Marxismo y Nacionalismo
NotaPublicado: Jue Oct 05, 2017 12:56 am 
Desconectado
Ateo dogmático
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: Dom Abr 19, 2009 10:07 pm
Mensajes: 12626
Goldstein escribió:
Imagen

Ya, y también se da el caso de movimientos nacionalistas que se apoyan en discursos y proyectos socialistas (en sentido amplio) para conseguir sus objetivos (que es lo que está pasando aquí). Un ejemplo de esto es el sionismo laborista en los años 20 y 30. De un libro que me leí hace un tiempo: La posición oficial de Ben-Gurion era que no había conflicto entre los árabes y los judios sino un conflicto de clase con los terratenientes árabes y los efendis. Los trabajadores/campesinos árabes debían darse cuenta de que sus intereses coinciden con los de la clase obrera judía y que juntos podían crear un estado socialista. En privado, Ben-Gurión tenía claro que el conflicto con los árabes era inevitable, pero le parecía que esta era una estrategia válida para recabar apoyos...

_________________
Metzger escribió:
Solo un apunte: Eso del neo-liberalismo no existe


Arriba
 Perfil Email  
 
 Asunto: Re: Marxismo y Nacionalismo
NotaPublicado: Vie Oct 06, 2017 10:56 pm 
Desconectado
Contra viento y marea
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: Sab Jul 08, 2006 4:09 pm
Mensajes: 36994
Citar:
Marxism and the National Question in the Spanish State

Jim Padmore

THE SPANISH unification of 1492 led to the formation of one of the earliest and strongest European states. Today Spain is one of the European states whose unity is most under question.

Spain has known periods of great power and wealth, with dominance in Europe and an empire in America. But the profits from America were not invested in a capitalist way, and the embryonic bourgeoisie was all but destroyed. So the state’s exaggerated centralisation didn’t have at all the same effect as in, for example, France where the economic base was very different. So there was a strengthening of the state, an absence of capitalist development, and the particularities of the old kingdoms persisted to a large extent.

Industrialisation, when it did take place, was almost exclusively in Cataluña and the Basque Country. The 1898 crisis with the loss of the last overseas colonies only spurred on the Basque and Catalan nationalists. Writing in 1931, Trotsky noted that "Spain’s retarded economic development inevitably weakened the centralist tendencies inherent in capitalism. The decline of the commercial and industrial life in the cities and of the economic ties between them inevitably led to the lessening of the dependence of individual provinces upon each other. This is the chief reason why bourgeois Spain has not succeeded to this day in eliminating the centrifugal tendencies of its historic provinces. The meagreness of the national resources and the feeling of restlessness all over the country could not help but foster separatist tendencies. Particularism appears in Spain with unusual force, especially compared with neighbouring France, where the Great Revolution finally established the bourgeois nation, united and indivisible, over the old feudal provinces".1

Almost eighty years earlier Marx had written of how, in the sixteenth century, towns had exchanged "the local independence and sovereignty of the Middle Ages for the general rule of the middle classes, and the common sway of civil society. In Spain, on the contrary, while the aristocracy sunk into degradation without losing their worst privilege, the towns lost their medieval power without gaining modern importance. Since the establishment of absolute monarchy they have vegetated in a state of continuous decay ... the absolute monarchy in Spain, bearing but a superficial resemblance to the absolute monarchies of Europe in general, is rather to be ranged in a class with Asiatic forms of government. Spain, like Turkey, remained an agglomeration of mismanaged republics with a nominal sovereign at their head. Despotism changed character in the different provinces with the arbitrary interpretation of the general laws by viceroys and governors; but despotic as was the government it did not prevent the provinces from subsisting with different laws and customs, different coins, military banners of different colours, and with their respective systems of taxation".2

In the twentieth century, especially from the 1920s onwards, separatist tendencies came to the fore, and the question of the possible independence of Euskadi and Cataluña was posed. What attitude should Marxists take in this situation? Trotsky explained that "We are not concerned, of course, with calling upon the Catalans and the Basques to separate from Spain; but it is our duty to insist on their right to do this should they themselves want it",3 and that "The workers will fully and completely defend the right of the Catalans and Basques to organise their state life independently in the event that the majority of these nationalities express themselves for complete separation. But this does not, of course, mean that the advanced workers will push the Catalans and Basques on the road of secession. On the contrary, the economic unity of the country with extensive autonomy of national districts, would represent great advantages for the workers and peasants from the viewpoint of economy and culture".4

Is this consistent with the positions of Lenin and the revolutionary Comintern? Lenin argued that the demand for the right to self-determination was "not the equivalent of a demand for separation, fragmentation and the formation of small states. It implies only a consistent expression of struggle against all national oppression".5

His Tasks of the Proletariat in Our Revolution states: "the proletarian party first of all must advocate the proclamation and immediate realisation of complete freedom of secession from Russia.... The proletarian party strives to create as large a state as possible, for this is to the advantage of the working people; it strives to draw nations closer together, and bring about their further fusion.... Complete freedom of secession, the broadest local (and national) autonomy, and elaborate guarantees of the rights of national minorities – this is the programme of the revolutionary proletariat."6

What of socialists who are inclined to reconcile themselves with the ideas of separatism? Trotsky had this to say: "What does the programme of separatism mean? – the economic and political dismemberment of Spain, or in other words, the transformation of the Iberian Peninsula into a sort of Balkan Peninsula, with independent states divided by customs barriers, and with independent armies conducting independent Hispanic wars. Of course, the sage Maurín7 will say that he does not want this. But programmes have their own logic, something Maurín doesn#146;t have."8

_________________


Arriba
 Perfil Email  
 
 Asunto: Re: Marxismo y Nacionalismo
NotaPublicado: Sab Oct 21, 2017 12:19 pm 
Desconectado
Ateo dogmático
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: Dom Abr 19, 2009 10:07 pm
Mensajes: 12626
Sobre los bolcheviques y el nacionalismo
Citar:
https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/ ... rated_the/
The answer to this question really lies in the differences between the Russian Revolution and Civil War and the Second World War. Both conflicts not only took place in different geopolitical contexts, but also in a different ideological environment that conditioned Soviet responses to the national question and territorial formation.

The national question caught Lenin and company somewhat flat-footed in 1917. As Marxists inside an active revolution, they were naturally disinclined to give much weight to the national issue. In classical Marxism, nationalism was a tool of the bourgeoisie and monopoly capital to distract and divide the proletariat from achieving true class consciousness. Although the turn of the century saw the emergence of significant models of how nationalism would fit in a worker's revolution (eg Austromarxism, Cultural-National Autonomy, Personal National Autonomy, etc.), the Bolsheviks found after their seizure of power that they now had to deal with the nationalities question with concrete policies. The Russian empire, whose various state organs were disintegrating as the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace, was majority non-Russian, but a good portion of the Bolshevik leadership and rank and file were Russian or Russified. The result was that Bolshevik leadership tended to move on the nationalities question with a mixture of tactical declarations with the aim of using nationalism to secure the revolution.

This was not entirely successful at first. Lenin boldly declared after the November Revolution that the Bolsheviks championed the right of national self-determination with the aim of encouraging wider revolution. When Finland declared its independence in December 1917, the Bolshevik leadership accepted it in the hopes of that a Finnish communist party would take power, but an anti-communist government took power in Helsinki after a brutal civil war. Likewise experience in the Baltics, where anti-communist nationalists tended to take power with German assistance, meant that Lenin needed to condition his call for national self-determination. This meant Bolshevik responses towards the national issue were often tactical compromises with a clear agenda that nationalism could not work against the wider interests of the revolution.

The historian of tsarist nationalities policies Eric Lohr has described the eighteenth-century tsarist approach to immigration as "attract and hold" meaning that they induced foreign colonists like the Volga Germans to settle and then kept them inside the empire through a variety of state levers. "Attract and hold" is also an apt metaphor for to post-Finnish Bolshevik nationalities policies. The Bolsheviks encouraged the revolution in the vast non-Russian empire and appeals towards nationalism was one of the tools in the Bolshevik's arsenal. The Bolsheviks simply could not ignore nationalism in light of the Civil War lest it be instrumentalized by the Whites. Leaving national movements alone risked another Finland. In Central Asia and the Caucuses, Lenin crafted an appeal to nationalist sentiment by dividing nationalism between exploiter and exploited nations. Bolshevik agitprop materials often emphasized the Great Russian chauvinism of the empire had encouraged a healthy counter-response among the exploited non-Russian masses. However, the Bolshevik approach always called for some sort of mediation of nationalism by the emerging Communist Party. This bifurcated approach towards nationalism, attracting non-Russians with promises of national justice but holding them within an ideological structure, became one of the hallmarks of Soviet nationalities policies. The 1920s saw the introduction of korenizatsiia (indiginzation or as Terry Martin terms it "Soviet affirmative action) in which the Communist Party sought to raise up native cadres of Communist activists inside their own territory. Although the state walked away from korenizatsiia in the 1930s, it never really went away in the USSR and would remain part of the Soviet policy until the end of the USSR in 1991. This imparted a certain political stability to areas like Central Asia in which local elites assumed positions of power within the Communist Party apparatus.

By 1944/45, it was a much more different situation. Although to be clear, the Soviets did annex significant territory from Finland, Poland, Romania, East Prussia, Czechoslovakia, and the Baltics, so sizable portions of Eastern Europe did end up inside the USSR proper. But Stalin's basic agenda for Eastern Europe was to expand the Soviet sphere of influence and secure the Soviet state (and these two precepts were pretty much indistinguishable in practice). For areas under direct Soviet influence, this meant encouraging local Communist parties to take power, through legal and extra-legal means. Moscow could count on a wide number of emigre Communists to take these posts and nationalism was one of the tools used by these satellite Communist parties to cement their rule. While Communist-style nationalism had yet to achieve the prominence as a legitimization stratagem it would in the 1950s, wartime and postwar propaganda produced by these Eastern European Communist parties stressed a popular front and a desire for the nation to rise up and cast out the foreign German invader and their collaborators.

Preserving national borders, albeit altered for Soviet purposes, also fit into the larger geostrategic designs of Stalin. Not only would massive annexations further rupture the wartime alliance with the Western Allies, it would also be counterproductive for the wider postwar Communist movement. Stalin expected, with some justification, that Western European Communist movements would achieve broad electoral gains in the immediate postwar period. Broad annexations in Eastern Europe would hurt this chance as nationalism still exerted a powerful force and French and Italian Communists were still French and Italian. The time was not yet ripe for the erasure of the nation and its replacement with a Soviet identity.

Germany was also a special case in Soviet calculations. Although the hindsight imparted by the Cold War has made German division appear a foregone conclusion, things were not so clear in 1946/46. The occupation and military governments were explicitly temporary and Allied wartime agreements held that Germany would be reunited once all the Allies signed a proper peace treaty with an acceptable successor German government. The KPD, later renamed the SED, as well as the Soviet military government placed emphasis in their electoral propaganda that a KPD/SED list was a step against a Western-led division of the country. In reality, Moscow as well as Washington shared blame for German division, as did the various postwar German parties.The Soviet zone's media did emphasize the justness of the Oder-Neisse line and the Soviet annexations of East Prussia, but often in ways that framed these territorial revisions as essential for the postwar order and peace.

Things, of course, did not play out in the postwar period as Moscow expected. Nationalism became one of the Achilles' heels in Eastern Europe and there was a widespread sentiment that the ruling elite did not really have the nation or the people's best interests at heart. The Soviet's use of hard and soft power to rig Eastern European elections for Communist victory likewise denuded the Communism of much of its postwar prestige in Western Europe. Ironically, the slightly higher standard of living within Eastern Europe and compared to the USSR created a degree of resentment within the wider USSR in the 1970s that their satellites were living better than the leading partner in the Communist experiment that had to bear the burden of being the elder brother in the family of socialist nations.

_________________
Metzger escribió:
Solo un apunte: Eso del neo-liberalismo no existe


Arriba
 Perfil Email  
 
 Asunto: Re: Marxismo y Nacionalismo
NotaPublicado: Dom Oct 22, 2017 10:29 am 
Desconectado
Contra viento y marea
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: Sab Jul 08, 2006 4:09 pm
Mensajes: 36994
El artículo que desmonta a la falsa izquierda soberanista y la muestra como lo que es TRAIDORA a la clase obrera.
Este artículo explica por qué me he borrado de Podemos:
Hay que ser muy imbécil y muy NAZI para obligar a alguien a elegir entre dos identidades culturales.
El Procés o la revolución de los niñatos insolidarios.
Dedicado a los "ahora te hago casito"

Citar:
La izquierda frente a la secesión
Las identidades son consustanciales a la vida política y social pero hay que aprender a atar en corto los sentimientos que despiertan las identidades y construir diques de racionalidad para canalizarlas en un sentido emancipatorio de justicia y solidaridad

El proceso secesionista catalán está liderado por tres grupos sociales: por los empleados de origen catalanoparlante vinculados a la Administración autonómica; por los (pequeños) empresarios venidos a menos con la crisis o que no han podido resistir la competencia europea, como es el caso de la familia del propio Artur Mas; y por las clases medias tradicionalistas vinculadas a los territorios de antigua adscripción carlista, y que han sido fuertemente beneficiados por la política de subvenciones de los gobiernos de Pujol. Es gente de orden poco dada a aventuras políticas, pero su ideario político forma parte de uno más general que se fue configurando en amplias zonas de Europa con la radicalización de las políticas neoliberales. Está fuertemente implantado en la derecha alemana pero también en la de los tigres exportadores austríacos, finlandeses, en la de las regiones del norte de Bélgica e Italia, y naturalmente también en la de los Países Bajos.

En dicho ideario, el territorio, entendido como unidad muy cohesionada cultural, identitaria e institucionalmente, tiene que competir duro frente a otros territorios para alcanzar saldos comerciales positivos y atraer inversiones. Este discurso del chauvinismo del bienestar, que sólo en su versión más conservadora tiene un componente étnico, puede degenerar en ultraderecha pero no es necesario que lo haga. Las países del sur de Europa, pero también sus propias regiones deprimidas —el este de Alemania, el Mezzogiorno italiano, la región belga de Valonia— son percibidos como lastres fiscales por los que prefieren no tener que sentir solidaridad alguna con el fin de preservar el propio bienestar. El ala conservadora y liberal del independentismo catalán mira a través de un filtro como este: el “Estado español”, un artificio culturalmente ajeno, es un lastre del que hay que desprenderse para poder convertirse en la Finlandia del Mediterráneo. De ahí a pedir la secesión sólo hay un pequeño paso.

Para los sectores conservadores esta forma de pensar no representa un escollo ideológico insalvable pero las izquierdas incurren en contradicciones importantes para salvar su discurso independentista. Estas últimas tienen dos ramas principales y una tercera que no acaba de engrosar, lo cual provoca fuertes quebraderos de cabeza entre los sectores que lideran el procés. La primera son las clases medias instruidas y progresistas, la vieja gauche divine que es la que se inventó lo del “Estado español”, que en los años ochenta cambió el discurso social por la causa identitaria, y que representó la rama soberanista del PSC —en menor medida también la la del PSUC— hasta que ambos partidos saltaran por los aires. La segunda son los hijos radicalizados de las clases medias conservadoras de origen carlista que forman el sector mayoritario y más identitario de las CUP, y que tienen en mente un igualitarismo semirrural, similar al de la antigua Herri Batasuna en Euskadi. A estos dos grupos se suma una parte —más bien pequeña— de las clases obreras y populares sin origen catalanoparlante dispuestas a sacrificar su identidad heterodoxa a cambio se subirse al carro de un territorio pujante que promete ser la Finlandia del Mediterráneo, y que incluiría un Estado de bienestar altamente desarrollado. Estos últimos son minoritarios dentro del bloque independentista pero sus ideas no son despreciables pues están muy implantadas entre una parte de la emigración de las regiones ricas de Europa, emigración que se une a los autóctonos en su lucha territorial contra los pobres del sur con la esperanza de beneficiarse de un sistema de bienestar desarrollado.

Sin estas dos ramas y media de la izquierda el secesionismo no sobrepasaría nunca el 25% de la población catalana. El grueso de las clases obreras y populares catalanas no participan del proyecto, bien porque se niegan a tener que elegir entre dos identidades sea cual sea la retórica democrática que las envuelva, bien porque sospechan, con razón, que los señoritos de Barcelona se volverán a olvidar de ellos una vez reciban sus votos para hacerse con el poder.

Mientras el secesionismo liberal-conservador tiene un discurso ideológicamente coherente desde el punto de vista de sus propios valores, el discurso de la izquierda secesionista contradice los suyos. Además, esta última adopta una actitud escapista en el momento de abordar las más que previsibles consecuencias de su arriesgada apuesta. Para empezar, el discurso del “derecho a decidir” fuerza a elegir entre dos identidades, violentando la realidad cultural de una parte sustancial de la población catalana y española en general. Por trasfondo familiar, por experiencia laboral y personal, pero también porque las identidades tienden a ser cada vez más mixtas en todo el mundo, el tener que “decidir” entre dos de ellas no es percibido como derecho sino como un artificio impuesto por los que quieren liquidar las identidades mixtas.

Las justificadas críticas de la izquierda contra las políticas antisolidarias que practican los tigres exportadores europeos para con los territorios del sur son, en segundo lugar, también irreconciliables con la negativa de los secesionistas de izquierdas —aunque también de los confederalistas de En Comú Podem— a participar en la construcción de un país de países territorialmente solidario y culturalmente heterodoxo similar a la que, desde una posición de izquierdas, intentan defender para el conjunto de Europa. Es irremediablemente contradictorio criticar a Merkel y a Schäuble, implicarse en la cooperación con el Tercer Mundo y pedir una redistribución que vaya del norte al sur, pero negarse, al mismo tiempo, a participar en la construcción de una caja común para que los niños extremeños y canarios puedan tener sus escuelas.

La zona más opaca de las izquierdas secesionistas es su negativa a abordar con frialdad las consecuencias de un proceso de secesión, especialmente si este no ha sido pactado. Se niegan a visualizar las consecuencias políticas e ideológicas de un enfrentamiento prolongado con España y de una dinámica radical de afirmación nacional para la dinámica social dentro de la propia Cataluña. Se niegan a abrir los ojos a las consecuencias sociales que tendrán para las clases catalanas menos favorecidas las políticas destinadas a atraer inversiones y a evitar la descapitalización, políticas que obligarían a bajar salarios y a reducir gasto público para favorecer a los inversores internacionales. Se niegan a enfrentarse políticamente al ambiente que va a generar la tergiversación continuada de la historia a la que se verán sometidas varias generaciones en el contexto de una dinámica persistente de reafirmación nacional: el ejemplo polaco y el de otros países del este de Europa es extremo pero extrapolable. Narcotizados por el cebo del “derecho a decidir” prefieren no abordar el coste de los ciclópeos intentos que va a exigir el reconocimiento internacional y que obligará a establecer alianzas antinaturales para conseguirlo, alianzas que desmontarían de lleno los apoyos a causas justas como la el derecho de los palestinos a un Estado propio en paz con sus vecinos. Se niegan, tanto ellos como no pocos izquierdistas del resto de España, a abrir los ojos al efecto multiplicador que tendría la dinámica independentista en toda España, incluidos el intento del nuevo Estado catalán de incorporar al País Valenciá y Baleares a su territorio y zona de influencia, así como el reforzamiento de la agenda nacional en otras regiones como Euskadi, Navarra, o Baleares, pero también en otras muchas regiones de Europa que se verán estimuladas a radicalizar su discurso identitario siguiendo el ejemplo catalán.

Se niegan a ver, además, que el fenómeno estatal es distinto a principios del siglo XX que a principios del siglo XXI. Las izquierdas critican con razón las políticas occidentales de las últimas décadas destinadas a romper Estados díscolos, muchos de ellos laicos, con el fin de ganar influencia en determinadas zonas estratégicas del mundo e iniciar procesos de nation building inspirados en recetas neoliberales. Pero no quieren ver que su proyecto de fragmentación del Estado español —aquí sí procede llamarlo así— generaría una dinámica muy similar de debilitamiento de todos los espacios públicos tanto al norte como al sur del Ebro. Sea cual sea la retórica izquierdista de los que sueñan con una República Catalana envuelta en valores progresistas, lo cierto es que lo público sufrirá necesariamente un retroceso generalizado con el fin de atraer inversiones y reconstruir un tejido económico roto, máximo teniendo en cuenta que su ingreso en la Unión Europea va a ser mucho más improbable de lo que muchos quieren hacerle ver a los despistados.

El antiestatismo español se nutre de la tradición de los movimientos anarquistas del siglo XIX fuertemente implantados en Cataluña, movimientos que fueron una respuesta a un Estado liberal y autoritario que no mostraba sensibilidad alguna por las necesidades de las clases subalternas. El antiestatismo de izquierdas, que enlaza con la idea de la autodeterminación que ahora las derechas independentistas utilizan como cebo para ganar a las izquierdas para su causa, fue una respuesta lógica a los Estados autoritarios del este de Europa para con algunas de sus minorías tras la I Guerra Mundial. Pero extrapolar aquella realidad, en la que los viejos Estados resultaban inservibles para la modernización y los anhelos de democracia y justicia social, a la situación actual en la que los Estados son los únicos actores con capacidad de hacerle frente a las grandes corporaciones, a los mercados financieros o a los retos para la seguridad de las personas, etcétera, es un error fatal.

Es verdad: el pacto de la Transición con el posfranquismo permitió el traslado de no pocas estructuras, hábitos, identidades y tradiciones del pasado dictatorial al nuevo Estado democrático en España; es verdad que ahí está una de las causas del desbarajuste identitario en el que se ha convertido el país. Pero convertir el Estado español en algo comparable a la Rusia de los zares o al Estado franquista con el fin de legitimar su liquidación a principio del siglo XXI, en un momento en el que las clases más desfavorecidas sólo disponen de las instituciones públicas para hacer valer sus intereses frente a los poderes económicos y financieros, no sólo es hacer una lectura fantasiosa de la historia del siglo XX, sino cometer otro enorme error político de consecuencias imprevisibles para todo lo que defiende la izquierda en España y en Europa en general.

Las izquierdas, incluidas las independentistas, deberían arrostrar estos escenarios con valentía, frialdad y objetividad. Las identidades políticas son consustanciales a la vida política y social pero la izquierda tiene que aprender a atar en corto los sentimientos que despiertan las identidades y construir diques de racionalidad para canalizarlas en un sentido emancipatorio de justicia y solidaridad. Si no se canalizan los sentimientos pueden generar desastres colectivos como los que conocemos del siglo XX europeo mucho antes de que se pueda reaccionar para impedirlo

Armando Fernández-Steinko es catedrático habilitado de Sociología en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

_________________


Arriba
 Perfil Email  
 
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
 [ 19 mensajes ]  Ir a página Previo  1, 2

Todos los horarios son UTC + 1 hora [ DST ]


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: Bing [Bot], CommonCrawl [Bot] y 2 invitados


No puede abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No puede responder a temas en este Foro
No puede editar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede borrar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede enviar adjuntos en este Foro

Saltar a:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Traducción al español por Huan Manwe